"I'm capable of doing things I never thought I could do. I'm motivated to start my own company. I want to make a difference in my community." — Diana, 16

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Who We Are

Launched in Spring 2012, Girls Who Code is a national nonprofit organization working to close the gender gap in the technology and engineering sectors. With support from public and private partners, Girls Who Code works to educate, inspire, and equip high school girls with the skills and resources to pursue opportunities in computing fields.

News & Updates

@GirlsWhoCode
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Dec 15, 2014

GIRLS WHO CODE TRIPLES ITS REACH TO CREATE GENDER PARITY IN TECH

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Dec 11, 2014

Girls Who Code on CBS This Morning

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Nov 6, 2014

Accenture Teams with Girls Who Code to Support Technology Careers for Young Women

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Oct 29, 2014

Girls Who Code and Samsung launch Mobile App Challenge

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Why It Matters

0.3%

In middle school, 74% of girls express interest in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), but when choosing a college major, just 0.3% of high school girls select computer science.

100%

100% of 2012 program participants report that they are definitely or more likely to major in computer science following the program.

12%

Women today represent 12% of all computer science graduates. In 1984, they represented 37%.

12%

While 57% of bachelor’s degrees are earned by women, just 12% of computer science degrees are awarded to women.

17%

Despite the fact that 55% of overall AP test takers are girls, only 17% of AP Computer Science test takers are high school girls.

25%

Women make up half of the U.S. workforce, but hold just 25% of the jobs in technical or computing fields.

29%

The U.S. Department of Labor projects that by 2020, there will be 1.4 million computer specialist job openings. Yet U.S. universities are expected produce only enough qualified graduates to fill 29% of these jobs.

3/25

In a room full of 25 engineers, only 3 will be women.